India is the largest user of groundwater in the world. It uses an estimated 230 cubic kilometers of groundwater per year - over a quarter of the global total. More than 60% of irrigated agriculture and 85% of drinking water supplies are dependent on groundwater. Urban residents increasingly rely on groundwater due to unreliable and inadequate municipal water supplies.

About 30 percent of Earth's fresh water lies deep underground in aquifers. And it's extracted daily for farming, drinking and industrial processes – often at dangerously unsustainable rates. Nowhere is this more evident than India, which guzzles more groundwater than any other country. 54 percent of India's groundwater wells are decreasing.

Despite the valuable nature of the resource, 29% of groundwater blocks are semi-critical, critical, or over-exploited, and the situation is deteriorating rapidly Moreover, aquifers are depleting in the most populated and economically productive areas. Climate change will further strain groundwater resources.


Image source: www.wri.org

More than 54% of India's ground water wells are decreasing

215 views
0

India is the largest user of groundwater in the world. It uses an estimated 230 cubic kilometers of groundwater per year - over a quarter of the global total. More than 60% of irrigated agriculture and 85% of drinking water supplies are dependent on groundwater. Urban residents increasingly rely on groundwater due to unreliable and inadequate municipal water supplies.

About 30 percent of Earth's fresh water lies deep underground in aquifers. And it's extracted daily for farming, drinking and industrial processes – often at dangerously unsustainable rates. Nowhere is this more evident than India, which guzzles more groundwater than any other country. 54 percent of India's groundwater wells are decreasing.

Despite the valuable nature of the resource, 29% of groundwater blocks are semi-critical, critical, or over-exploited, and the situation is deteriorating rapidly Moreover, aquifers are depleting in the most populated and economically productive areas. Climate change will further strain groundwater resources.


Image source: www.wri.org

Uploaded to 1 week ago

In this album

Cookie Settings