Almost all battery technologies use lithium as one of its important raw materials. And should the electronic revolution continue the way it is now, or grow more, this mineral will become even more important. Smartphone batteries use nearly 3 grams of the light metal, 30 grams go in to laptop batteries, and the standard e-car batteries can use 10 kilos of this mineral. Car models by U.S. maker Tesla have 40 kilos in their battery packs. 
This infographic shows that Chile has the highest reserves of lithium in the world of around 7.5 million metric tons. This could make the South American country one of the most important players in the electronic age. However, most Lithium still comes from Australia where mines produce some 14,300 metric tons last year, this according to data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). 
2013 data shows the U.S producing 870 metric tons, and there is a likelihood of to 38,000 tons in reserve. However, data figures on reserves are dynamic given that the quantity reduces as the ore is mined, and at the same time the feasibility of extraction also diminishes. But if additional deposits are discovered, the data would continue to show higher figures.
Image Source: Statista
Image License: CC BY ND

Chile likely to lead the world in lithium business

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Almost all battery technologies use lithium as one of its important raw materials. And should the electronic revolution continue the way it is now, or grow more, this mineral will become even more important. Smartphone batteries use nearly 3 grams of the light metal, 30 grams go in to laptop batteries, and the standard e-car batteries can use 10 kilos of this mineral. Car models by U.S. maker Tesla have 40 kilos in their battery packs.
This infographic shows that Chile has the highest reserves of lithium in the world of around 7.5 million metric tons. This could make the South American country one of the most important players in the electronic age. However, most Lithium still comes from Australia where mines produce some 14,300 metric tons last year, this according to data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).
2013 data shows the U.S producing 870 metric tons, and there is a likelihood of to 38,000 tons in reserve. However, data figures on reserves are dynamic given that the quantity reduces as the ore is mined, and at the same time the feasibility of extraction also diminishes. But if additional deposits are discovered, the data would continue to show higher figures.
Image Source: Statista
Image License: CC BY ND

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