An analyzed data from the United Nations (UN) and the Global Talent Competitiveness Index (GTCI), shows how countries compete for talent and which ones do it best. It compares the top 25 countries in terms of attracting and retaining talent. Since, Highly skilled workers are in demand, worldwide. Many countries make substantial efforts to compete for top talent.

Many host countries end up with higher concentrations of high-skilled immigrants in particular occupations. For example, immigrants account for some 57 percent of scientists in Switzerland, 45 percent in Australia, and 38 percent in the United States. Foreign-born individuals made up 27 percent of all physicians and surgeons and more than 35 percent of current medical residents in the United States in 2010.

There is a strong inverse relationship between country size and high-skilled emigration rates. These movements of high-skilled people away from certain small and low-income countries have raised controversies about “brain drain.”  The economics of high-skilled migration quite different from those of low-skilled migration. 



Image source: http://kdmengineering.com/skilled-worker-migration/

Where do Highly Skilled workers go to work abroad?

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An analyzed data from the United Nations (UN) and the Global Talent Competitiveness Index (GTCI), shows how countries compete for talent and which ones do it best. It compares the top 25 countries in terms of attracting and retaining talent. Since, Highly skilled workers are in demand, worldwide. Many countries make substantial efforts to compete for top talent.

Many host countries end up with higher concentrations of high-skilled immigrants in particular occupations. For example, immigrants account for some 57 percent of scientists in Switzerland, 45 percent in Australia, and 38 percent in the United States. Foreign-born individuals made up 27 percent of all physicians and surgeons and more than 35 percent of current medical residents in the United States in 2010.

There is a strong inverse relationship between country size and high-skilled emigration rates. These movements of high-skilled people away from certain small and low-income countries have raised controversies about “brain drain.” The economics of high-skilled migration quite different from those of low-skilled migration.



Image source: http://kdmengineering.com/skilled-worker-migration/

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